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Painting PVC material

Posted on Thu, 16 Feb 2006 at 23:42



This should be an easy one for those who have done it and it worked out ok.

PVC is great! Sintra, Komatex... love it! 10mm & 13mm have all but replaced plywood in my shop... but I do still have customers that need black, royal blue, red, etc. backgrounds on their signs. Colors are readily available in 3mm, and limited 6mm thicknesses. Our attempts at finding a paint that will hold up on PVC over time have not been real sucessful. Laytex... forget it. Standard enamels won't adhear well, and too hot of a thinner can damage the surface. Plastics paint (Lacryl, etc.) tends to fade with direct sun exposure, don't cover well and have little to no gloss. Automotive paints and hardners seem to be the best choice we've found. What advice can you give?

Thanks.

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Comments

Anonymous says: Most PVC’s on the market are not meant to be painted in any sense of the word ‘PAINT’. One of their characteristics is to repel just about anything, paint being one of them. However, flooding, ...

Most PVC’s on the market are not meant to be painted in any sense of the word ‘PAINT’. One of their characteristics is to repel just about anything, paint being one of them. However, flooding, with screen printing ink made for whatever substrate you're using will work. Certain plastics require different inks. Get the correct compatible ink and mix the color your customer wants and flood it. If you don’t know what flooding is, we can post that later. The obvious problem here is that you have to stock so many types of inks, that it becomes very expensive to custom color all the different plastics out there. . Sometimes ‘Grip-Flex’ will work, but that’s a very transparent paint. That’s why prepping and painting duraply is still your best choice for custom made outdoor signs.

Good Luck.

posted on: Fri, 02/17/2006 - 12:27pm
Anonymous says: Some people "prep" the plastic with different products, problem is, some products (solvents,cleaners,etc.) will cause a polymigration (not all), try Rapid Prep, its a deep cleaning solvent that causes ...

Some people "prep" the plastic with different products, problem is, some products (solvents,cleaners,etc.) will cause a polymigration (not all), try Rapid Prep, its a deep cleaning solvent that causes no migration, its non haz./non flammable, and it works !

Roger

posted on: Fri, 02/17/2006 - 1:19pm
Anonymous says: We've used a primer (actually a barrier coat) that was recommended by our supplier then top coated with acrylic poly. Sheeting with vinyl can also be a good option. posted on: Fri, 02/17/2006 - 2:57pm
Anonymous says: You must first scuff the surface. We use a green scrubbing pad used for dish washing. Any supermarket will carry this. There is a new paint out call krylon which is specifically used for plastics. Home ...

You must first scuff the surface. We use a green scrubbing pad used for dish washing. Any supermarket will carry this.

There is a new paint out call krylon which is specifically used for plastics. Home Depot carries this product

Priming the PVC with UMA Bonder will help. Urethane Modified Acrylic Bonder. Then paint with the Krylon.

If you go to apply vinyl the transfer tape may still pull off the paint.
Very tough to get the paint to stick.

Worst case cover the PVC in vinyl with the color you need

Hope this helps.

posted on: Fri, 02/17/2006 - 4:25pm
Anonymous says: Heat up oil base paint with acetone. Spray lightly. Let dry. Spray lightly again. Done. posted on: Fri, 02/17/2006 - 8:45pm
Anonymous says: There are two paint manufacturers that make paint specifically for signs. Mathews & Akzo Nobel. They are acrylic polyurethanes that will adhere to the pvc. Akzo Nobel requires a "VPS Clear" before ...

There are two paint manufacturers that make paint specifically for signs.
Mathews & Akzo Nobel.
They are acrylic polyurethanes that will adhere to the pvc. Akzo Nobel requires a "VPS Clear" before the paint for all plastics, Mathews does not.
These paints are expensive but they will hold up to the sun and will work well.
Good luck!
Ray

posted on: Fri, 02/17/2006 - 9:57pm
Anonymous says: guess I don't know what you guys are talking about. An automotive acrylic enamel straight on the stuff should do fine, as will the likes of Krylon. This is what I do. Mark posted on: Sat, 02/18/2006 - 9:55am
Anonymous says: We use automotive paint. Gives a good long lasting hard gloss finish. posted on: Sat, 02/18/2006 - 7:12pm
patfoley says: When a thing does not want to be painted, it cannot be painted, no matter what you try with it. It’s bound to come off some day. PVC Signs posted on: Wed, 03/01/2017 - 5:38pm
Alice James says: The truth of the matter is that uPVC and cPVC (PVC from here on) are hard to paint. The reason is, is that PVC has a low surface vitality. All materials and water have a "surface vitality". The logical ...

The truth of the matter is that uPVC and cPVC (PVC from here on) are hard to paint. The reason is, is that PVC has a low surface vitality. All materials and water have a "surface vitality". The logical unit of surface vitality is Dynes/Centimeter. For reasons for discourse I will discuss the surface vitality, SE, of water and how it identifies with PVC. Well vinyl can be more useful option for sheeting.
http://www.mobex.co.uk/trade-show-trailer-hire.html

posted on: Mon, 03/20/2017 - 6:06am

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